May 19, 2012

  1. Museums of New Media Art should have their pieces be easily accessible to its audience.
  2. Museums of New Media Art should find a way to archive their pieces in an understandable method  to make it easy for their audience to browse through all the pieces they have ever shown.
  3. Museums of New Media Art should find a balance between the demands of the artists they host regarding how they exhibit heir pieces with the expectations of the audience.
  4. Museums of New Media Art should not exclude any demographic from properly appreciating the pieces they exhibit.
  5. At the same time, Museums of New Media Art should realize that different people will have different ways of interpreting the pieces.
  6. Museums of New Media Art should properly exhibit the pieces they have, especially the interactive ones, so that they serve their purpose.
  7. Museums of New Media Art should embrace pieces crafted in a great variety of methods and disciplines.
  8. Museums of New Media Art should embrace pieces crafted from various generations.
  9. Museums of New Media Art should utilize new and emerging technologies, such as constantly evolving social media networks, to exhibit and  spread the pieces they have to the masses.
  10. Museums of New Media Art should be open to change.

May 6, 2012

Four Letter Wordsby Rob Seward

2010

Four Letter Words, by Rob Seward is a light installation that generates four letter words through a combination of a word generating algorithm and fluorescent lights that move around in their spaces to generate these words. Six of these short fluorescent lights are rigged onto boards and rearrange themselves so that they are all able to form every letter of the alphabet. Four sets of these lights are put together so that when they light up, they form strings of words that are fed to them from a computer generated list. This list of words comes from an algorithm that generates words mainly according to similarities in form, allowing smooth transitions between words on the installation. The words generated have a dark undertone to them, which was taken from a study the artist was inspired from.

May 6, 2012

8-bit Color Cycling in HTML 5

Artist name: Mark Ferrari

Posted: July 6, 2011 (on Rhizome Recommends)

Color cycling was a technique used in the older generation consoles of Gameboy colors and Nintendo 64’s in order to make certain artifacts or elements in the game look animated. It is a technique wherein a palette of colors is chosen to fill in an image on the screen, and in order to make that image look animated the artist simply shifts the colors along the image in a logical pattern. An analogy that the artist used was that of marquee lights - they look as if the lights are chasing each other across the sign when in fact they are simply turning on and off in a sequence.

Ferrari took this rendering technique that has been around for quite some time now, and integrated it into HTML 5, the latest web development platform. It is an example of a combination of past and present multimedia conventions that resulted in a new and improved interpretation of what people are used to seeing. The end result of Ferrari’s work was more than just the fire and water elemental artifacts that this technique was used for in the past. It is a creation of full environmental scenes that show such a sharp improvement from what this technology was used for in the past.

To appreciate his work more, all his current Color Cycling works are found in the link below. If one were to click on the “Show Options” tab on the top right of the image, there are controls that actually control how fast or slow the cycling happens, as well as shows which pixels are actually cycling throughout the image.

LINK: http://www.effectgames.com/demos/canvascycle/?sound=0

Sources:

http://www.effectgames.com/effect/article.psp.html/joe/Old_School_Color_Cycling_with_HTML5

http://www.effectgames.com/effect/article.psp.html/joe/Q_A_with_Mark_J_Ferrari

May 5, 2012

3D Holographic Fashion Show

Fashion/Concept Design: Stefan Eckert

Tech Design: Tim Jockel

Show Director: Florian Sigl

3D Holographic Fashion Show, performed in Hamburg, Germany on March 31, 2011

German designer, Stefan Eckert, wanted to display his Haute Couture pieces in a way that was innovative yet still appropriately laid out his clothing pieces. As Haute Couture tends to focus on attention to detail, it would be best to have the clothes displayed in a way that makes it stand out and grabs the audience’s attention. Through a holographic fashion show, the team was able to capture models wearing the clothes, and were able to add various special effects during post production to make them look more extreme and attention grabbing.

This piece would tie in with one of Lev Manovich’s principles, as well as one that I proposed in my manifesto, of New Media being the mix between existing cultural conventions and software conventions. The concept of fashion shows and Haute Couture have existed for a long time, but the layer of technology and software added to this piece make it an exploration into the field of New Media.

May 5, 2012
Movie Barcode

Captain America: The First Avenger 2011

Artist: moviebarcode.tumblr.com

Created on: February 29, 2012

Although there is no name behind the blog, Movie Barcode has been a Tumblelog that has been garnering attention through their visualizations of popular movies. They take each frame in a movie and squeeze it into a space of one pixel onto a palette. To do this for an entire movie creates an interesting piece that conveys the tone, emotion, and pace of the movie from a virtual birds-eye perspective.

Aladdin (1992)

This piece shows the warmth and vibrancy of the movie Aladdin…as well as gives you a rough estimate of when that magic carpet ride is!

Rick Astley - Never Gonna Give You Up (1987)

Yes, you just got Rick Roll’d.

NyanCat (2011)

NyanCat, of course.

Source: http://moviebarcode.tumblr.com/

April 29, 2012
Flatness or Innovation

In his piece, “You are Not A Gadget: A Manifesto”, Lanier is fixed in his claims that current forms of digitization in the present day has led to a slow down of innovation in various fields, ranging from media arts to technology. He calls this phenomenon “flatness”, wherein everything created becomes bland and meaningless because they are created using the same resources and methods with no clear-cut differentiation between pieces (Lanier, 2). He pegs his frustration of this “flatness” mainly on the internet, and how its very essence makes media too accessible to the masses. While he is not completely against the open source movement, he presents facts to back up his claims such as how Wikipedia has grown to be too much of a standard, yet at the same time people get possessive of their entries, and that of media out in the Creative Commons is reused so much but are often touted as original pieces (Lanier, 13-16).

Ranciere would think that this phenomenon happens due to the fact that there is rarely any active spectatorship happening. Ranciere states that active spectatorship involves the roles of a student and a teacher, with the student taking in what he sees and feels from the master, and interpreting it in a way that only he can (Ranciere, 8). The creation of new ideas, however, depends not on the student but the master. New ideas stem from an emancipated spectator or student, one who is not limited to know only what his master knows, which is why having an ignorant master would be more ideal to innovation. This way, a student learns his methods under his master, but his creations are all his own (Ranciere, 8). As opposed to flatness, Ranciere says that there are many different starting points for creation, but it takes an activeness to realize the potential to create (Ranciere, 10).

Foucault could add that innovation could stem from the implementation of Jeremy Bentham’s idea of the panopticon. In his conception of the panopticon, different types of people from convicts to children are placed in isolated cells that circle around a single watch tower. Any actor can put himself in the role of the watchmen, as his identity does not matter as much as the fact that those being kept in the cells know that they could be in constant surveillance (Foucault, 4). While an assertion of power more than anything, it can also be turned into an experiment the capabilities of those held in the cells, possibly furthering innovation. As they are isolated from one another, they would be responsible for learning and advancing on their own ideas without the influence of others, and as they would be on constant surveillance from the central watch tower, they will feel obligated to do their tasks (Foucault, 6). Although not entirely feasible in the present day, it would translate to being a step forward from flatness and lead to more innovation in current practices.

April 23, 2012

LIVE!

LIVE to CREATE.

CREATE new IDEAS.

IDEAS that SHAPE.

SHAPE new ways of THINKING.

THINKING of different WAYS.

WAYS to MANIPULATE, DISCOVER, EXPERIENCE

OUR WORLD – our world is an ever-changing medium for thoughts, emotions, feelings, spontaneity, meticulousness, and expression! Now, more than ever before, we have been able to express ourselves in ways that would have been unimaginable years ago. NEW TECHNOLOGIES. NEW STYLES. NEW MEDIA. Everything is new! It’s a change from what was in the past, but is a reminder that things will not be the same in the future either. This means that everything is changing, and it is changing quickly. As witnesses to this rapidly evolving field, we must try to capture these pieces of work for their very essence – for the emotions they evoke at that one moment in time. This seems like a tall task for anyone who wishes to curate these works – a highly unstable mix of who knows what! A realization such as this begs the question, what is it that we are curating?

BE OPEN! Open to the reshaping of art in our contemporary, technology-centered world. Birringer says it best when he discusses the impact of technology on performance art, “Technology has decisively challenged bodily boundaries and spatial realities, profoundly affecting the relationships between humans and machines”. Although he talks about dance, this applies to the bigger sphere of the combination between technology and art. The more visible advancement of technology has inadvertently (OR NOT!) caused this giant combination to happen, as stated appropriately by Lev Manovich when he says, “New Media [is] the Mix Between Existing Cultural Conventions and the Conventions of Software.”

So now that we have the software, what can we do with it? Anything! The field of HCI is consistently thinking of ways to improve and innovate current software, to the point where they may soon become invisible to us – something that we do not need to think about, but just DO. Art pieces take on a whole new dimension with the augmentation of electronic elements such as projections and holograms. THIS is the direction New Media is heading towards. How exactly do we organize this?

The evolution of New Media did not necessarily leave the means to display these pieces in the dust! THE INTERNET, HYPERWALL DISPLAYS, even DVRs, give us the ability to collect, select, and DISPLAY all these new pieces that we feel are relevant to us, as well as those around us! Larger scale exhibitions, such as The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art are prime examples of how all these different methods of curating come together: physical displays, digital exhibits, and using the internet to generate interest, thoughts, and conversations. WE CAN DO THIS TOO! “From Here On” has it laid out best, “We’re making more than ever because our resources are limitless and the possibilities endless!” Use current tools to your advantage! Run a BLOG! TAG and LINK relevant pieces you find! Go the distance and create a MOBILE APPLICATION! CATEGORIZE them according to how it makes you feel, where you found it, what activity you were doing when you came across it. ANYTHING that allows you to share and preserve it!

The CREATION of new IDEAS happens each and every day. DISCOVER THEM. SHARE THEM. Let them provoke the way you see things, and prompt others to do the same! ARCHIVE them – allow our future to see what we have seen, and inspire them to go out and do the same, proliferating New Media Art (if they will still call it that) for as long as they shall LIVE. 

Sources:

"From Here On"

Human-Computer Interaction

Johannes Birringer. “Dance and Media Technologies”

Manovich, Lev. “New Media From Borges to HTML”

V2_ Mission

V2_ The Age of Instability

April 16, 2012

As discussed in classed a few meetings ago, it is difficult to capture the entire field of New Media into one concrete definition. Similarly, reading how much the genre has evolved over a span of decades surely makes the reader question whether or not the term is appropriate at all. Marcel Duchamp was an artist that Gere considered to be a pioneer of digital art, and he had this philosophy about New Media that resonates throughout the entire genre. He said that his art is not “retina art”. In other words, it is not necessarily meant to simply please the eye, but to get people to think of about the pieces – not only about the meaning behind it, but possibly the process behind its creation as well. 

Manovich states in his paper, “New Media is the Aesthetics that Accompanies the Early Stage of Every New Modern Media and Communication Technology”. I can see that connect with Duchamp’s previous statement in terms of new technologies prompting people to see what they can creatively do with it. Gere’s account of New Media development through the decades give us several examples of these situations, such as Csuri’s Hummingbird from 1968 and the Source.Code exhibit displayed at the Ars Electronica Convention’s Website. Although the Hummingbird may not seem like much compared to the Source.Code exhibition, one must realize that it was quite an achievement at that time, and probably drew the same amount of hard work and resulting awe that Source.Code did. These are exhibits that one may not expect to see from the technology given, but the creativity and aesthetic considerations that go into these are what make it an application of New Media art. This also ties in with another of Manovich’s propositions, “New Media is a Mix Between Cultural Conventions and Software Conventions”. The present quality of software makes it possible for people to think the way they do and be able to creatively express themselves in different fashions, with Source.Code being a prime example.

I feel that Gere’s statement about the importance of the gallery is extremely relevant. I interpreted the gallery to mean the entire online realm that serve as portals to these New Media pieces, and I agree with him saying that it is a way to archive these pieces to preserve their meaning. Pursuing a degree in Human-Computer Interaction I keep up with the evolution of such technology, and can see how ubiquitous computing will keep this present “gallery” of New Media work in the memory of the population, while at the same time expanding the realm of what could be possible.

April 5, 2012
'tis not quite the solar system.
Taken from the British Encyclopedia, or, Dictionary of arts and sciences, comprising an accurate and popular view of the present improved state of human knowledge. 
Originally from Harvard University. Digitized on January 31, 2008.

'tis not quite the solar system.

Taken from the British Encyclopedia, or, Dictionary of arts and sciences, comprising an accurate and popular view of the present improved state of human knowledge

Originally from Harvard University. Digitized on January 31, 2008.

April 5, 2012
Untitled 5 from Camille Utterback

Camille Utterback

San Francisco, California – in the middle of this eclectic city lives the innovative digital artist, Camille Utterback. She earned her Bachelor’s degree in Arts at William’s College and her Masters at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts. Utterback’s work is not only focused on creating aesthetically pleasing pieces, but on integrating human movement and gestures with the computational systems that power her pieces. Through the use of kinesthetic technology, her art installations and structures dynamically interact with the viewers of her pieces by reacting accordingly – and playfully – to their actions. 
Her exhibits are found across four continents, and these range from interactive projections on a wall to light shows that take up an entire building’s façade. An example of these works would be one of her earliest and most notable installations – the Interactive Text piece called Text Rain, where participants stand and move around in front of a projection on the wall and letters drop and fall around the shadow created by said participants in a pattern similar to that of rain. Utterback’s series of responsive art pieces have garnered her several prestigious awards and grants over the years, and are accessible at several museums and public settings across the nation.

Text Rain from Camille Utterback on Vimeo.
Links
Research
http://rhizome.org/editorial/2011/may/12/seven-seven-teams-camille-utterback-erica-sadun/
http://camilleutterback.com/vitae/bio/
http://camilleutterback.com/projects/text-rain/
http://news.stanford.edu/news/2012/february/visiting-artist-utterback-021612.html
http://atc.berkeley.edu/bio/Camille_Utterback/
Media
http://camilleutterback.com/projects/untitled-5/
http://vimeo.com/13141591
http://www.dispatch.com/content/graphics/2011/10/23/2-gund23-art-g6oei05i-1untitled-5-by-camille-utterback.jpg?__scale=w:460,h:333,t:2

Untitled 5 from Camille Utterback


Camille Utterback

San Francisco, California – in the middle of this eclectic city lives the innovative digital artist, Camille Utterback. She earned her Bachelor’s degree in Arts at William’s College and her Masters at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts. Utterback’s work is not only focused on creating aesthetically pleasing pieces, but on integrating human movement and gestures with the computational systems that power her pieces. Through the use of kinesthetic technology, her art installations and structures dynamically interact with the viewers of her pieces by reacting accordingly – and playfully – to their actions. 

Her exhibits are found across four continents, and these range from interactive projections on a wall to light shows that take up an entire building’s façade. An example of these works would be one of her earliest and most notable installations – the Interactive Text piece called Text Rain, where participants stand and move around in front of a projection on the wall and letters drop and fall around the shadow created by said participants in a pattern similar to that of rain. Utterback’s series of responsive art pieces have garnered her several prestigious awards and grants over the years, and are accessible at several museums and public settings across the nation.


Text Rain from Camille Utterback on Vimeo.

Links

Research

http://rhizome.org/editorial/2011/may/12/seven-seven-teams-camille-utterback-erica-sadun/

http://camilleutterback.com/vitae/bio/

http://camilleutterback.com/projects/text-rain/

http://news.stanford.edu/news/2012/february/visiting-artist-utterback-021612.html

http://atc.berkeley.edu/bio/Camille_Utterback/

Media

http://camilleutterback.com/projects/untitled-5/

http://vimeo.com/13141591

http://www.dispatch.com/content/graphics/2011/10/23/2-gund23-art-g6oei05i-1untitled-5-by-camille-utterback.jpg?__scale=w:460,h:333,t:2